Why we do things the way we do...

It’s been said that when you have two cider-makers in a room then you’ve at least three or more opinions, and that probably extends to the reasons why cider-makers become cider-makers.

To make money? Not if our experience is anything to go by and not the primary motivation, I think, for the craft cider-makers we’ve met. The pleasure of making something that people enjoy drinking must be part of it, one would have thought. Also appealing is the immediacy between the fruit that goes into the cider, in many instances grown by the cider-maker him- or herself, and the end result, with so many opportunities to influence the whole process; it’s a personal thing and that’s why there are so many different styles of cider. Cider-makers enjoy being cider-makers.

So how do we go about things? There’s a clue on the front of our label … and over the next few days, weeks and months we’ll blog (or vlog) more about why we do things the way we do.

Gloucestershire's apples

If you’re interested in Gloucestershire’s apples and orchards, come along to Toddington Village Hall (GL54 5DP) on Saturday 16th March, from 10:00 to 14:00. It’s an event organised by the Gloucestershire Orchard Trust. Learn about the DNA testing of Gloucestershire’s unique apple varieties, about Mistletoe and it’s place in traditional orchards (both good and not-so-good), about some fruit exchange projects happening in Gloucestershire.

There’ll be cake, as well …

Winter ...

The beauty of orchards is, in part, the combination of the regular and the random.  The trees are - at least they should be - planted in some kind of identifiable pattern, properly spaced to allow each tree to develop and to utilise the available space effectively.  The trees themselves grow into all sorts of contorted shapes, natural sculptures blessed by sun and buffeted by wind and rain, with no arrow-straight elements to them.